August/September

Mathematics – Place Value, Addition, and Subtraction

  • Read, write, identify place value to five digits
  • Round whole numbers to the nearest ten and hundred
  • Compare and order up to three whole numbers (four digits or less)
  • Use relationships between adding and subtracting to solve problems
  • Estimate and find the sum and difference of three-digit whole numbers
  • Create equations to represent equivalent mathematical relationships
  • Count and compare coins and bills to $5.00
  • Identify, create, describe, and extend patterns found in objects, pictures, numbers, and tables

Science – Interactions with Matter and Earth’s Water

  • Solids and liquids mix with water in different ways
  • Many solids dissolve more easily in hot water than in cold water
  • The sun is the driving force of energy behind the water cycle (evaporation, condensation, and precipitation)

Language Arts –

  • Use knowledge of regular/irregular vowel patterns
  • Decode regular multi-syllabic words
  • Discuss meanings of words
  • Set purpose for reading
  • Make connections while reading
  • Make, confirm, and revise predictions
  • Identify conflict and resolution
  • Sequence events
  • Differentiate between fiction and non-fiction
  • Use complete sentences, capital letters, punctuation, and articles (a, an, the)

Social Studies – Civics – Good Citizenship

  • Explain the responsibilities of being a good citizen
  • Respect and protect rights and property of others
  • Take part in the voting process when making decisions
  • Describe actions that can improve the school/community
  • Demonstrate self-discipline and self-reliance
  • Practice honesty and trustworthiness
  • Describe the purpose of rules and laws

October

Mathematics – Multiplication and Division

  • Represent multiplication and division through 10 x 10, using a variety of models (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 10 facts only)
  • Create and solve single-step problems that involve multiplication and division through 10 x 10 (2, 4, 5, and 10 facts only)
  • Demonstrate fluency with multiplication facts (0, 1, 2, 5, and 10)
  • Create equations to represent equivalent mathematical relationships

Science – Force and Simple Machines

  • Multiple forces may act on an object
  • The net force on an object determines how an object moves
  • Simple machines increase and or change the direction of a force
  • Uses of simple machines
  • Uses of compound machines
  • Differentiation and classification of the six simple machines (lever, pulley, screw, inclined plane, wedge, wheel and axle, and axle)

Language Arts –

  • Apply language structure (use word chunks/parts) and phonemic strategies
  • Use context clues to clarify meaning
  • Use knowledge of homophones
  • Ask and answer questions
  • Identify the theme
  • Read with fluency, accuracy, expression
  • Preview of text features (table of contents, headings, pictures, captions, maps, index, charts, etc.)
  • Organize narratives
  • Transition words
  • Spelling strategies
  • Simple abbreviations

Social Studies – Geography and Map Skills

  • Develop map skills by using globes and maps to locate and describe major rivers, mountain ranges, and other geographic features of Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and South America

November/December

Mathematics – Data Analysis, Probability, and Multiplication and Division (part 2)

  • Investigate and describe probability and list possible outcomes
  • Collect, organize, and represent data in pictographs or in bar graphs
  • Read/interpret data represented in pictographs and bar graphs
  • Represent multiplication and division through 10 x 10, using a variety of models (3, 6, 7, 8, 9 facts)
  • Demonstrate fluency with multiplication facts (0, 1, 2 5, and 10)
  • Solve single-step multiplication problems of whole numbers, where one factor is 99 or less and the second factor is 5 or less
  • Create equations to represent equivalent mathematical relationships

Science – Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecosystems and Earth’s Water

  • Ecosystems are made of living and nonliving components of the environment
  • Relationships exists among organisms in an ecosystem
  • Elements of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems
  • Major sources of water on earth

Language Arts –

  • Use knowledge of homophones
  • Apply meaning clues while reading
  • Fact vs. Opinion
  • Compare and contrast setting, plot, and characters
  • Summarize plot
  • Identify narrator
  • Practice using text features (table of contents, headings, pictures, captions, maps, index, charts)
  • Use background knowledge to provide context
  • Using prewriting strategies of brainstorming and using graphing organizers
  • Identify target audience for writing and purpose for writing
  • Express opinion while writing

Social Studies – Economics and Mali

  • Recognize that because people and regions cannot produce everything that they want, they specialize in what they do best and trade for the rest
  • Identify examples of making an economic choice and explain the idea of opportunity cost
  • Mali – Demonstrate an understanding of different cultures and the natural, human, and capital resources they used in the production of goods and services 

January

Mathematics – Fractions

  • Name and write fractions and mixed numbers represented by a model
  • Represent fractions and mixed numbers with models and symbols
  • Compare fractions having like and unlike denominators using words and symbols (>, <, =, and ≠), with models
  • Solve practical problems that involve addition and subtraction with proper fractions having like denominators of 12 or less using models representing area and regions, length and measurements, and sets
  • Create equations to represent equivalent mathematical relationships

Science – Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecosystems

  • Food chains in the ecosystems
  • Key terminology – producer, consumer, decomposer, herbivore, carnivore, omnivore, predator, and prey

Language Arts –

  • Use knowledge of synonyms and antonyms
  • Use context clues to clarify meaning
  • Use word reference resources (dictionary and glossary)
  • Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension
  • Introduction to folktales, fairy tales, fables, etc.
  • Identify main idea and supporting details
  • Ask and answer questions
  • Sequencing charts
  • Organize paragraphs (main idea, topic, and closing sentences)
  • Identify paragraphs

Social Studies – Mali

  • Describe the oral tradition-storytelling, government (kings), and economic development (trade) of the early West African empire of Mali
  • Develop map skills and understand changes over time by locating ancient world cultures on world maps
  • Identify the changes of the cultures at the beginning of their culture, during their period of greatest influence, and today
  • Describe how people of ancient world cultures adapted to their environment

February

Mathematics – Measurement

  • Estimate and use U.S. Customary and Metric units to measure length to the nearest half inch, inch, foot, yard, centimeter, and meter
  • Estimate and measure the distance around a polygon with no more than six sides to find perimeter using Customary and Metric units
  • Estimate and count the number of square units needed to cover a given surface to find area
  • Estimate and use Customary and Metric units to measure liquid volume in cups, pints, quarts, gallons, and liters
  • Tell time to the nearest minute
  • Solve elapsed time problems in one-hour increments
  • Identify and solve problems related to equivalent periods of time
  • Read temperatures to the nearest degree in both Fahrenheit and Celsius

Science – Adaptations

  • Populations change and adapt over time for survival
  • Behavioral and physical adaptations of animals

Language Arts – Informational Text and Research Writing

  • Use knowledge of roots and affixes (suffixes and prefixes)
  • Use word reference resources (glossary, dictionary, and thesaurus)
  • Draw conclusions and make inferences
  • Folk tales – fairy tales, fables, etc.
  • Draw conclusions
  • Summarize information
  • Practice using text features
  • Research: ask questions, evaluate and collect information
  • Past and present verbs

Social Studies – China and Egypt

  • Explain how the contributions of ancient China and ancient Egypt have influenced the present world in terms of architecture, inventions, calendar, and written language
  • Develop map skills and understand changes over time by locating ancient world cultures on world maps
  • Identify the changes of the cultures at the beginning of their culture, during their period of greatest influence, and today
  • Describe how people of ancient world cultures adapted to their environment

March

Mathematics – Geometry, Place Value, Addition and Subtraction

  • Identify and draw representations of points, lines, rays, and angles
  • Define polygon
  • Identify and name polygons with 10 or fewer sides
  • Combine and subdivide no more than three polygons with three or four sides and name the resulting polygons
  • Identify and describe congruent and noncongruent plane figures
  • Identify, describe, create, and extend patterns found in objects, pictures, numbers, and tables
  • Read, write, and identify the place and value of each digit in a six-digit whole number, with and without models
  • Compare and order whole numbers each 9,999 or less

Science – Adaptations

  • Behavioral and physical adaptations of animals
  • Fossils provide evidence about the environment and types of organisms that lived long ago

Language Arts – Poetry and Descriptive Writing

  • Use word reference resources to identify and apply multiple meaning words
  • Use vocabulary from other content areas
  • Review compound words and contractions
  • Poetry – set purpose, make connections, draw conclusions, identify theme, ask and answer questions, summarize, compare and contrast
  • Read with fluency, accuracy, and expression
  • Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension
  • Identify purpose of writing
  • Singular possessives
  • Apostrophes
  • Commas in series

Social Studies – Greece and Rome

  • Explain how the contributions of ancient Greece and ancient Rome have influenced the present world in terms of architecture, government (direct and representative democracy), and sports
  • Develop map skills and understand changes over time by locating ancient world cultures on world maps
  • Identify the changes of the cultures at the beginning of their culture, during their period of greatest influence, and today
  • Describe how people of ancient world cultures adapted to their environment

April

Mathematics – Place Value, Addition, and Subtraction

  • Round whole numbers, 9,999 or less, to the nearest ten, hundred, and thousand
  • Solve problems using rounding of numbers
  • Estimate and determine the sum and difference of two whole numbers, each 9,999 or less
  • Create and solve single-step and multi-step practical problems involving sums or differences of two whole numbers, each 9,999 or less
  • Count and compare coins and bills to $5.00
  • Make change from $5.00 or less
  • Identify, describe, and extend repeating and growing patterns found in objects, pictures, numbers, and tables
  • Create equations to represent equivalent mathematical relationships

Science – Soil

  • Soil provides nutrients and habitats for organisms to live and for plants to grow
  • Soil takes a long time to form and should be conserved

Language Arts – Functional Text (Recipes, Flyers, Etc.), Author Study, and Expository Writing

  • Use context clues to clarify meaning
  • Review roots and affixes, homophones, synonyms and antonyms
  • Review theme, conflict and resolution
  • Summarize plot
  • Compare and contrast
  • Draw conclusions
  • Make connections
  • Practice nonfiction strategies previously taught during nonfiction text
  • Revise writing
  • Writing process

Social Studies – Greece and Rome and Government

  • Greece – Describe how people in ancient world cultures adapted to their environment
  • Recognize that Americans are a people of diverse ethnic origins, customs, and traditions and are united by the basic principles of a republican form of government and respect for individual rights and freedoms

May

Mathematics – Practical Problems with Whole Numbers

  • Estimate and determine the sum and difference of two whole numbers, each 9,999 or less
  • Create and solve single-step and multi-step problems involving sums and differences of two whole numbers, 9,999 or less
  • Create and solve single-step problems that involve multiplication and division through 10 x 10
  • Solve single-step problems involving multiplication of whole numbers, where one factor is 99 or less and the second factor is 5 or less

Science – Human Impact and Conservation and Earth’s Water

  • Human activity affects the quality of air, water, and habitats
  • Water is limited and needs to be conserved
  • The importance of water on earth

Language Arts –

  • Review using context clues and decoding regular multisyllabic words
  • Review using word reference resources (glossary, dictionary, thesaurus)
  • Review fiction comprehension strategies
  • Differentiate between fiction and nonfiction (particularly the author’s purpose and text features)
  • Revise writing
  • Writing process

Social Studies – Government

  • Recognize the importance of government in the community, Virginia, and the United States of America
  • Explain the purpose of laws
  • Explain that the basic purposes of government are to make laws, carry out laws, and decide if laws have been broken
  • Explain that government protects the rights and property of individuals